Tag Archives: Canada

Demolition of Ripple Rock, Seymour Narrows, British Columbia

Seymour Narrows is a narrow section towards the South end of the Inside Passage running between Puget Sound and Alaska.  Currents up to 8-9 knots flow through here and Ripple Rock was a major hazard to navigation.  This route is very busy with cruise ships, tugs and barges, fishing vessels, and recreational vessels.

Here is the story of removing that Ripple Rock hazard:

 

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The Wreck of the Nathan E. Stewart

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I had been home a couple weeks from the San Francisco run and I was at Crawford’s Nautical School taking a course, when the office called with another last minute, hurry up job.  Our job was to tow the D.B. General derrick barge to be used in the salvage of the Nathan E. Stewart.

Early on the morning of October 13, 2016 the Kirby ATB tug and barge ran aground at the entrance to Seaforth Channel approx. 8 miles from the central British Columbia town of Bella Bella.  The site is just as you would enter Seaforth channel from sea coming in from Queen Charolette Sound and Hecate Straight.  With a westerly or southwesterly swell the site is fully exposed to breakers and surge. (sorry for the sideways photos below – I tried everything I could think of to fix it)

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Position in the rocks

An articulated tug and barge (ATB) is a type of tug that fits into the notch at the stern of a barge and locks in with large hydraulic pins.  To learn more about the design, please follow this link: ATB Design by Robert Allen Ltd.

The Stewart was southbound with an empty petroleum barge when she ran hard aground at Edge Reef and Gale Rocks.  The empty barge’s outer hull was breached however when the tug struck the rocks her hull was also breached and she lost one of her shafts and propellers.  It took around four hours for the tug to sink and as she sank, she came out of the notch and disconnected from the barge.  The tug spilled around 66,000 U.S. Gallons of diesel.  The barge was able to be floated off the rocks at high tide and was removed from the wreck site before we arrived.  If you look at the photo of the chart above, you can see a small channel just east of the wreck site called Gale Pass.  Much of the spill washed up on the beaches near the wreck and went into Gale Pass with the tide.

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We arrived with the D.B. General on a Wednesday morning with nearly perfect weather and the General crew went straight to work making last minute preparations to their equipment and flaking out all of the heavy 3″ chain and cable straps they would use to drag and lift he tug.  By the end of Thursday they were ready and we waited for the call to move the General to the wreck site and begin the removal.

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The whole time we waited for the call to move the weather was perfect.  Abalone had been observed on the rocks around were the anchors and chain would lay so it was decided to bring in starfish to try and herd the abalone out of harms way.  After 2 or 3 wasted days, the divers just picked them up and moved them.

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We finally were tasked to move to the site on Monday morning.  The plan was for us to move the General to the site with the assistance of the Seaspan Haisea Guardian tug.  The General has large 20,000 lbs. anchor on each corner of her deck.  We would slowly motor the barge ahead and as we pass over the outer anchor drop points, the barge would drop her anchor and pay out as we continued to the next drop point.  Then the General could pull herself back to the center of the two offshore anchors.  We would set her two inshore anchors for her by nosing up to the anchor as it hung from the corner of the barge, running a large 8 strand line through the anchor shackle and making it off on our bow bitts.  The General’s winch operator would slowly payout until the weight of the anchor was hanging from our bow and we would slowly back away from the barge towing the anchor to the predetermined drop point.  Once we were at the drop point, we would take a couple turns off our bitt and the anchor would fall away.  The barge could then position herself further offshore or winch herself inshore closer to the wreck.  You can see in the photo below how the barge could change positions by adjusting her anchors (again sorry for the sideways picture).

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Additionally, there was a gigantic Stem Shark anchor placed off of the offshore side of the barge approx 500′  and connected to the barge with 3″ chain.  On the inshore side, amidships of the barge, 3″ chain went to the wreck where the divers had cut out the tow pins on the barge and rigged a bridle out of the chain.  There were two massive hydraulic pullers on the deck of the barge.  One would tension up on the offshore stem shark anchor while the other would pull tension on the sunken tug.  The max pulling capacity was 300 tons. See photo of Stem Shark anchor below:

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It took most of the day to move, set the anchors and get the heavy chains connected to the Stem Shark and to the tug.  The next morning when I woke up, the workers were taking all of the connections apart and we were told to prepare to move the General back to the protected Norman Morrison bay due to incoming weather.  It took most of the day to move her back and get her tucked in.  It’s a good thing too because over the next five days of standing by we had some ferocious blows up to 70 knots.

Some underwater shots of the Stewart:

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Finally we moved back to the wreck, except this time there was a lingering swell.  As we approached the anchor drop points, our tug was made up along side of the General and we had the Haisea Guardian on the opposite bow of the barge.  We got the first anchor set and slowly moved to position the second anchor when a large set of swells came through.  We were running two head lines (one was a large 9″- 8 strand line we affectionately called “Big Nasty” due its difficulty handling it), a doubled up spring line 8″ and a 8″ stern line.  When the surge came we parted the 8″ head line, the double spring line and the stern line.  The only line that didn’t part was Big Nasty but that was because the bitt on the barge Big Nasty was made off to ripped off the deck of the barge and sling shotted back into the house on our tug.  Very dangerous!  It is amazing how much stored energy a nylon line can release when it parts and you have got to be aware NOT TO STAND IN THE SNAP BACK ZONES!  On the other side of the barge, the Guardian also parted their spectra head line.

Luckily we got both offshore anchors down and we were able to set the inshore anchors with no further issues.  The chains were connected to the stem shark and to the tug and the pulling began!  As chain tension came up, the Stewart turned easily and started to come toward us fairly well. Later in the afternoon she got hung up and no matter how much tension the crews pulled, she just wasn’t going to budge.  The divers had to spend several hours rigging air bags and pumping air into the tug as best they could to try and lift her bow over the “curb”.  The curb was a rock ledge about 3′ high that stopped the Stewart in her tracks. Photos below: The Stewart had been parallel to the beach but she turned offshore easily and then hug up on the “curb”.

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Since we had parted so many of the lines, I spent most of my watch mending lines, splicing new eyes, or trying to make something usable out of the remnants.  The captain decided that we wouldn’t make up along side next time and that we would use a set of soft bridles instead.  We went down into the fore peak to retrieve the matched set of 140′ long bridles and there was only one!  Somewhere along the line on a previous trip one was damaged or used for something else and not replaced.  I took one new 85′ spring line with an eye at each end and flaked out on the deck in the fore peak. Then I laid one of the longer remnants of parted line exactly on top of it to get the length just right and spliced a new eye so we had two 85′ bridles.

Later in the day as the pulling was progressing, the swells seemed to be picking up.  The command boat suggested to the General to relax pulling and winch themselves further offshore.  They chose to continue pulling as they were making good progress.  Right at dark some massive sets came in and broke just offshore of the General and her western most offshore anchor slipped.  Were rushed in and threw up our new bridles.  As we passed up the first line (the new line) and they got it on the bitt, we took a huge swell and the line came super tight.  We all scattered for shelter but the line held.  We managed to get the second line up and pull away as we dumped wire.  When we got to a position where we could take a strain, the new line was stretched out about 4′ longer than the line I spliced (shit!).  That meant that all of the strain would be on the used line that I had just spliced the eye in.  We pulled on the barge all night to keep her in position and from slipping her anchors and moving any closer to the rocks. The used line with my new splice held together thankfully.

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Photos below: We pulled through the night to keep the General in position.  The photos from the next morning show the swells were way down.

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The next day reset the offshore anchor and the pulling continued.  They managed to get the Stewart pulled off the reef and into deeper water.  Only her top pilot house was showing.  Then we broke off from her and returned to the protected bay for more incoming weather.

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A few more days of waiting around and we returned one last time to prepare the Stewart for lifting.  The divers spent much of the day rigging the chain and cable rigging that would be used to lift her.  The estimated weight full of water was around 460 tons.  The General has a capacity of 700 tons. Rigging the lifting gear:

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The weather slowly started to pick up again and the rains came in.  We were fearful that we would have to stand down again.  Right at the end of the day the big lift came:

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I racked out because I knew we’d be getting a call out to pull anchors and move back to the bay.  I didn’t manage to get any shots of the Stewart being loaded onto the barge (it was dark anyway).  We moved the General back to the bay late that night and in the morning the Stewart was on a different barge anchored not too far away:

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I’m not sure where she was taken from this point.  We had a couple days of buttoning up the General and then we towed her back to Seattle.  Our planned 6 day trip (to drop off the General) ended up being 27 days start to finish.

I’ve never been involved with a salvage of this size.  There was a tremendous amount of effort covering many aspects.  There had been a full depth contour survey done, massive amounts of oil boom put out and constantly mended and monitored, oil skimmer boats, crew boats, standby tugs, barges with tanks for pumped out fluids to be stored, etc.  The Canadian Coast Guard sat on scene the whole time guarding the wreck and also checking in and out the crews and little boats coming and going from the site to ensure they returned to port each time and make sure no one was lost along the way.  There were multiple flyovers each day looking for progress and oil slicks.  There was a boat that collected trash from all  of the other boats during the weeks so that was never an issue.  Overall there was a lot of planning and coordination to make this happen safely.  I was highly impressed overall even if it seemed like we wasted a lot of time in the beginning.

Hope everyone has a wonderful Thanksgiving, stays out of the snap back zones and stays safe!

Update 12/3/2016: The Stewart was taken to Vancouver, Canada to be scrapped at the Amix yard.

 

Tug Boating to Alaska

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Hello sports fans!  I’m sorry to be away for so long from my blog (seems to be a recurring problem).

I went to Compass Courses in Edmonds in August for the 5 day Leadership and Managerial Skills course.  The course could have easily been packed into 2.5 days instead of 5, thank you USCG for your foresight on this issue!  On the last day of class, Aug 12th, I finished the final exam at 1100, got in my truck and drove to Everett, where my wife met me at the Dunlap Towing yard and drove my truck home for me while I crewed up on my first tug job.  Pretty much as I stepped on board, the gangway came up and we threw off the lines to get underway to Seattle.

In Seattle we stopped to fuel up and wait for our freight barge to be brought out to us from the Duwamish River by Western Towboat.  Western has a dedicated tug that operates around the Dirty D (Duwamish River) and it common for companies to handoff their barge or receive a barge from the Westrac (Western Towboat’s tug in the area) as they bring it in or out of the river to a waiting tug or place it on the West Seattle Buoys, where barges can be left for short periods of time as sometimes a berth needs to open or a tug is running late and the buoys are where these barges can be placed to keep them out of the way for short periods.

As soon as we fueled and made up to our barge we were underway for Alaska.  Our barge was 330′ and loaded with freight for Alaskan towns with mostly containers and some rolling stock like trucks and a new school bus.  Since I was on the mid watch from 12-0400 with the second mate, I went down for a nap before watch.  We passed very familiar places on the way out of Puget Sound and instead of heading west out of the Straights of Juan De Fuca, hung a right and Rosario Straights towards Vancouver Canada.  We passed through the Seymour Narrows sometime on my off watch when I was asleep and I didn’t get to see the famous narrow spot.  The last time I was through here was when I was a kid and we took our family boat North around 1978 (which I don’t remember much of).

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Other than going to Dutch Harbor and some of the Aleutian Chain last June on the research vessel, I’ve never been to Alaska.  Let me tell you this:  YOU NEED TO GO THROUGH THE INSIDE PASSAGE!  It absolutely stunning!  Of course the route that we took, was the most direct to Juneau possible, there is still an incredible amount of bays, coves, inlets, passes, mountains, etc to keep one busy for a lifetime of cruising.  We passed several cruise ships (it was cruise ship season) coming and going from Seattle to Alaska.  These huge ships haul ass and I could only think about the people who pay to “see” Alaska and then miss over half of it while their ship steams along at 20+ knots while the passengers are sleeping at night.  Of course they get to go many ports and take quick little excursions that we are unable to do on a freight run.

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2.5 days after leaving Seattle, we arrived in Juneau to offload some freight.  We needed to arrive on a tide, offload our freight, backload and lash the oncoming freight and a huge Taylor Forklift and depart before we lost the tide.  I think we were in town for around a total of 3 or 4 hours.  So much for seeing Juneau!  I could only see as much of it as was visible from our tug or our barge.

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A couple of days later we were at the top of the Inside Passage and headed out into the Gulf of Alaska headed toward the Alaskan Town of Yakutat.  Again we pulled in, offloaded cargo, back loaded cargo and departed for sea.  The only major difference from Juneau was the fact that the container yard we tied up to in Yakutat did not have a ramp for the forklifts to drive onto the barge and pick a loaded container and drive it off ashore.  Instead they used the Pass/ Pass technique where the barge forklift sets the container right at the rail and the forklift from shore picks it right off of our deck and drives it into the storage yard ashore.  

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At this point in the trip it was cloudy and rainy and we didn’t get to see shit as far the incredible Chugach Mountain range that we steamed right past.  A couple days more and we entered Cook Inlet heading towards Anchorage.  We arrived around 2200 and worked cargo until around 0200 in the morning and retired for the night.  This port is a major port and has all of the equipment to efficiently offload / backload cargos.  The downfall of this port is the massive 20+’ tide swings.  The tug actually has to break tow and go lay at another dock several hundred yards away from the barge.  When the tide goes out, the barge just sits on the mud bottom while cargo ops continue.  At this point, word came down that our mission would take us to Dutch Harbor with a small amount of container freight but after that we would travel West to Unmak Island and the town of Nikolski to load dirty dirt (more on that later).  In order to load dirty dirt, our barge needed a “fence” built on our barge of 40′ containers stacked two high and lashed all the way around the deck of the barge to help contain the load of dirty dirt.  The dock crew from the yard had this pretty much complete when we turned to in the morning around 0700.  We finished up, returned to the tug and waited for a delivery of stores to arrive (the cook had gone shopping at the grocery store).  As soon as the stores were loaded we made up to the barge and departed for sea.  I think we were in Anchorage for about 10 hours…never left the tug, barge or yard.  Great way to see the sights!

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Once we got underway, we were headed west to the Aleutians.  The scenery along the Alaskan Peninsula and Kodiak Island was stunning!  While we didn’t have perfect weather we got to see quite a bit of the mountains and had some really good, flat water.  A few days later we arrived in Captains Bay (on the back side of Dutch Harbor Proper).  The scenery here was also amazing and it is nearly impossible to think of a more scenic port!  We discharged all of our remaining cargo and got immediately underway for Unmak Island and Nikolski.  the steam from Dutch was about 24 hours and upon arrival at Nikolski, we entered the bay, slowly steamed into the wind and started dumping wire from the tow winch while zig zagging our way upwind.  at the top of the bay, the tug made a big sweeping left hand turn and continued dumping wire until we were pretty much abeam of the barge about 100 yards away.  This is called “Laying on the wire” and is how we would remain for the next several days as loaded “dirty dirt”.  No anchor needed!

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The town of Nikolski is a group of around 18 houses and an Orthodox Church.  Mostly natives live from what I’m told.  The church, like many places in remote Western parts of Alaska, were built by the Russians way back when.  I’m sure all of the materials had to be brought in as there isn’t a tree in sight in any of the Aleutians that I saw except right in town were someone plated one.

As soon as we were secure, a landing craft came out from shore carrying a load of dirty dirt and picked myself and the ab cook up and took us over to our barge.  The landing craft could load 25 racks at a time.  Each rack carried 3 large bags of dirty dirt.  The dirty dirt is soil that is contaminated by diesel, spilled when the military departed the Aleutians after WWII.  Contractors dig up the dirt, fill the bags and place them on flat racks.  The landing craft crew loads 25 racks in a load and delivers them to the barge where they pass / pass the dirt aboard and we stack it and lash it for the ride to Seattle.  In Seattle, it is offloaded, transferred to rail and taken to Portland, Oregon to be incinerated and decontaminated.  We spent several days loading dirt.  Upon our arrival back at the tug, we found out the remaining crew had been busy catching five fresh halibut.  We gave one to the landing craft and I cleaned the rest as no one else knew how.  Fresh Halibut….Yum!

Once the dirty dirt was loaded, we returned to Dutch to load more dirty dirt that had been recovered from Adak a week or two earlier.  Once we got all of the dirt loaded, we filled in all the remaining space with heavy equipment that was pulling out due to the end of the working season.  We then received word that we would be standing by several days waiting for a second barge to come it from Naknek (Bristol Bay) before we could head toward to home.  We spent our days working cargo ashore or being tasked with moving barges around the harbor.  While we were tied up in Captains Bay, two different captain friends came in on factory trawlers and tied up at the next dock over from us.  Both times, we were so busy that I didn’t get a chance to walk over and say hello.  The next morning when we had time, they were gone.

We did manage to borrow the yard truck and go to the Dutch Harbor Library and get connected to the internet and chat with home.  It was about two weeks since I had been able to check in.  FYI: Verizon does not work in Dutch (AT&T and GCI are the only two at this time that do) but the local library has free wifi.  

We also went over and visited the new Gretchen Dunlap.  The Gretchen is Dunlap’s new harbor tractor tug and is quite impressive.  Read more about her here: Gretchen Dunlap.

Finally, after some weather delays, our barge arrived and we got underway from Captains Bay.  We steamed slowly out of the bay with our barge streamed astern way back on the wire.  The second tug pulled right up alongside of us and we passed them our Swede wire, which they attached to the tow gear.  We pulled tight on their tow gear as they broke off from it and pulled away from us.  We then pulled their tow gear onto our deck and made it up to our second tow wire / winch.  Then we streamed the second barge out, but not as far as our first barge, which was way back.  This is how we travelled back to Seattle.

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It took a total of 14 days to get back to Seattle and other than a couple of days crossing the Gulf of Alaska was very pleasant weather.  As we approached Vancouver Island on the Inside Passage, word was passed that we wouldn’t be allowed to travel further South than Cape Scott (N/ end of Vancouver Island) with two barges and that we would have to take the outside of Vancouver Island to return to Seattle.  Luckily for us, the weather was perfect!

We returned to Seattle and dropped our first barge off to the waiting Western Towboat tugs and while they took that barge upriver, we put the second barge on the buoy for them to retrieve when they are finished with the first barge.  We steamed two hours back to our yard in Everett and 45 minutes after tying up, I was at home, kicking my feet up and chillaxin.

Great trip overall.  There are things I really like about tugs and things I don’t like.  For the sake of any new people getting their feet wet and trying to decide what sector of shipping they would like to get into, here are a few of my thoughts:

Likes:

Small crews and no passengers to deal with.

Better pay than research vessel

Great crews with lots of experience and willing to teach a FNG like me

Towing shit is cool and the making and breaking a tow is cool.

I was left pretty much to my own to find shit to do / what to paint/ projects etc.

Yard is very close to my home

Dislikes:

The tug gets very small after a couple of weeks.  Bring books, movies etc to stay occupied in your time off.

The tug gets its ass kicked in weather more than a big ship.  You will feel it and the tires on the side of the hull take a bit of time to get used to.  The engine noise is much louder than it was on the ship I was on.  I slept with ear plugs at all times.

Comms with home are very limited compared with what I came from.

There isn’t really any schedule going to these remote areas.  Weather and customer delays are common.  Alaska freight is boom or bust depending on the season.  Prepare to be super busy in the spring / summer / early fall and slow in winter for the most part.  This works really well from some people as they like to travel during the winter.

The bunks on the tugs were built for short people.  If you’re tall like me, prepare to sleep sideways or with your legs bent. (Yes, I know I’m being bitchy)

Overall very good trip and I learned a ton!  Total was 37 Days.

 

 

 

Nootka Sound, Vancouver Island

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Returned home a week ago from a brutally long hitch of nearly 4 months at sea.  Didn’t feel especially inspired to fight our painfully slow internet and make many posts along the way.  Most of the hitch was spent in different legs along the Washington and Oregon coasts deploying and recovering science gear.  One trip extended down to Cape Mendicino, CA and another to Nootka Sound, Vancouver Island (pictures included).

This was the second year in a row we’ve made the senior student trip to Nootka.
We did lots of water sampling, mud coring, plankton tows, plastic tows etc.

It is such an amazing place and a great place to be when the winter storms are raging outside the fjords.

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We had to run offshore during the trip to make water this year.  While offshore, we recovered a wayward science buoy from Oregon State University that broke free of its mooring near Newport, OR.   There is a video of that coming later.

https://blueoceanmariner.wordpress.com

Visiting Nootka Sound, Vancouver Island Canada

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We just returned from Nootka Sound on the West Coast of Vancouver Island, Canada. This was an 11 day senior thesis project for all the seniors to complete their field projects prior to graduation. Some of them studied bottom samples (mud) near the site of an old mill, others studied microbiology, a few studied the mixing of fresh and salt water in the deep fjords and the effects of tidal flushing and others starfish wasting (the starfish on the West Coast are melting away due to a virus). We carried a small boat so that some students could work on their projects in areas we couldn’t take the ship.

As we departed Seattle, there was a very strong low pressure system approaching the coast. As we passed the West end of the Straights of Juan De Fuca and Cape Flattery we were pounded by high winds and swell. Our ship looked like it had an Ebola outbreak as there were sick students everywhere! Luckily for them, we only had to transit approx. 12 hours on the outside before reaching the inside protected waters of Nootka. As the storm passed we had some very nice days. The fjords in Nootka Sound are very narrow in places, sometimes less than three of our boat widths, and very deep (nearly 200 meters). This place is off the grid. We had an internet black hole while we visited the area due to the steep mountains. The locals nearly all travel in small aluminum pilothouse boats. There are a few roads, but many of the towns are 30-50 miles by dirt road. A few use float planes to get around. There are several fish farms in various inlets and we saw one active heli-logging operation. This would be a great place to take your boat and get away from it all.

Scenery Photos:
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As we returned to Seattle, we were met with another storm on the outside. A final parting gift for our students to remember. Overall Nootka is very scenic and would be a great place to visit when there were more time to explore the many coves, inlets and nearby lakes.

To all mariners at sea: MERRY CHRISTMAS!

Fjords, bears and natural beauty: Vancouver Island

Vancouver Island

Last week we finished a two and a half week long trip to the West Coast Of Vancouver Island (WCVI). We left Seattle with clear sunny skies and made the transit to Victoria to clear customs. Victoria is a really scenic waterfront city with a unique inner harbor. We arrived just as the last of three large cruise ships was arriving in town for the evening. The city was jammed with tourists. A band played on a waterfront dock and few piers down from us and it was warm. A perfect late summer time to hang out in a waterfront town.
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The next morning we departed early and just as we passed Race Rocks, we entered thick fog for the rest of the day. We entered Barkley Sound and began knocking out sampling stations and ended at the head of Effingham Inlet.

This first week was all about taking water and bottom samples throughout the numerous islands, fjords and channels. The main focus was to search for a microscopic sized cyst that is highly toxic. The cyst causes many issues including red tide found in shellfish. The water data that is recorded is used by the next science party the following week. More on that later. Needing to sample such a vast area, we would take a sample with the CTD and the water column would be recorded for temperature, salinity, oxygen, light, etc., then capture water at various depths and move to the next station a mile or two away and repeat. Two or three times we would re-rig the crane wires and drop a bottom core contraption down to collect a bottom sample (mud). They would also tow a little net on the surface that collect material and later sampled for plastic.
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The next morning the fog had lifted off the water and hung at about 100′. We wandered throughout the Broken Group Island chain. There are countless little hidden bays, coves, little beaches, and anchorages. We only saw a few boats. This would be an ideal place to bring your kyak and explore for a week or two. Upon leaving the Broken Group and the inland deep fjords, the clouds pushed East and we were met with bright sun….and wind. Plenty of wind. We had to make a run to the North and had about 22 miles of open coast to transit right into the stacked seas.

The Barnes, our converted ice breaking inland harbor tug (notice: no mention of coastal or ocean in the description) made it through but she has this really funny roll / yaw / motion due to the shape of her ice breaking hull. The net result was that everyone but the captain, myself and the Mike the marine tech were sick. A couple really sick.

We made it through and arrived in Tofino. Tofino is one of those towns that was once a sleepy little commercial fishing town and maybe some loggers lived there too. Then the surfers found out about the surf and the whole place exploded. Now it has coffee shops, board shops, hotels, restaurants, art stores, a tatoo parlor and numerous whale watching / fishing / float plane/ and bear watching tours.
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From Tofino, the trip included going to the head of most of the big inlets (fjords).
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Taking a bottom core (mud collection). See the little tube with a perfect mud sample:
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Near the end of the first week, our anchorage for the night was near a natural hot springs. We pulled in and anchored, launched the small boat and I ferried a could loads of people to shore so they could go soak. I didn’t go because there was about 15 minutes of daylight left and I wanted to catch some rock fish to eat. That plan failed because by the time I got everyone to shore and then made it to the fishing spot, it was really dark. Early the next morning, Mike the marine tech and I left in the dark and when the light came we nuked the rock fish and ling cod in about 25 minutes. We both filled our catch limit and headed back to the ship, loaded the small boat back onboard and pulled anchor right on time. I cleaned fish in between sampling stations much to the horror of the squeamish girls onboard. That night we had a BBQ and some excellent fish tacos!
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That night the science party disembarked and the new group arrived and worked late into the night setting up all of their equipment. They use the recorded water sample data that was collected by the first group and look for areas over anoxic water (areas with no oxygen) to do their research.

The main thrust of the project is to test new equipment that will be used in other areas of the world with large anoxic zones, primary Peru, Pacific Baja Mexico and Bermuda. Tofino Inlet, with it’s close proximity to Seattle and it’s very anoxic condition, make it a perfect place to test this equipment. Tofino inlet is basically a long deep fjord (approx 100 meters depth)extending way up into the mountains. A few miles from the head of the inlet are a couple of small islands on either side of the inlet and between them is a high spot (approx 30 meters depth). This high spot essentially cuts off the flow of deep water trapped on the upper end of the inlet. The tides can exchange to top layers of water only. The deeper layers remain stagnant and have so for approx 100 years. They have found microbiology living in these waters that have only been found in areas such as deep hydrothermal vents.

The equipment being tested relates to falling particles. I’ll do my best to pass on what was explained to me. It goes like this: About 1/3 of the world’s CO2 is in the deep ocean, another 1/3 is on the surface (in alage) and the plants etc on land, the last third is in the atmosphere. Some of the CO2 that falls into the ocean is consumed in the food chain such as algae and plankton, etc. Some of that dies and falls to the deep ocean floor effectively removing it from the system. Their equipment is meant to catch these falling particles and measure the rate at which they fall. The idea is that if enough falls to the deep ocean it won’t be in the atmosphere causing global warming.

The way they catch these falling particles is with big nets that hang way down in the water column from a surface float. The particles land in the net and then are collected in a little bottle at the bottom where they can be taken into the lab and studied.
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The second way is with traps. These traps will be free drifting in the ocean and have several chambers in the collection bottle that close at different intervals. Here is what the traps look like:
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We saw quite a few bears on the beaches during the low tides. If you are closer in to town, the bears are used to the tour boats pulling right up to the beach and tourists taking thier picture. Out away from town they are more skittish. That is unless there are some tasy crabs under those rocks for lunch:
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The last couple days the clouds returned and it rained lightly. We had absolute flat water conditions all the way back to Victoria and on to Seattle. I got home late Friday evening and left again on Sunday evening to drive 3.5 hours to Portland, OR for ARPA Class. (see previous post).

I would absolutely love to cruise the entire West Coast of Vancouver Island over about a month or two!

Stay tuned for more posts in the coming few weeks!